Post 1490: Serendipity!

Andy knows better, but doesn’t care. The dining room table is a wonderful place to explore! Of course, in the process, he knocked things around.

I tried to straighten things up a little and stumbled on a big, wonderful kitty surprise! No, not a hairball, but a…

…Neko replacement toy in its original packing, a virgin toy! Andy got excited, of course, so we had a sweet little play session. Dougy came around for some, too!

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38 thoughts on “Post 1490: Serendipity!

    • Ha! I guarantee he made about half of the mess, and Dougy the rest! The table is in much better order now, thanks to needing to straighten things up so my friend and I could eat lunch there after the eclipse. Since I usually eat alone, I use the table as a work space, a place to write checks, read mail, store books and magazines I have yet to read. Cats, who aren’t supposed to get up on the table (but do regardless, make sure they knock things around and off the table. As a matter of fact, while Craig and I were eating lunch, Andy hopped up on the table, right in between us! Craig doesn’t have pets, so was properly alarmed, but I knew all I had to do was put my hand on him, and he voluntarily hopped back off to the floor. Dang cat!

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    • The eclipse was a wonder beyond doubt! The kitty boys pretty much didn’t react to it. It was a big deal here in Alliance, Nebraska and other places along the total eclipse route. Seeing the lines of cars leaving town was almost as big an event as the event itself. To give you a sense of the magnitude, the next town is about 50 minutes away at the speed limit, yet the report was that it took people three hours to drive it after the eclipse! I saw the line coming from Carhenge, and it was bumper-to-bumper going south and north.

      It was easier to take a country road back to town than to try to merge with traffic.
      When Nebraska was opened up to settlement, settlers could claim 640 acre pieces of land, a square mile [259 hectares] that they got for free from the US Government if they made certain improvements on it and lived there a given length of time. The consequence is there is a gridwork of roads that are a mile to intersecting roads, making travel around the highway cluster easy to do, if dusty! I drove to the first intersecting road, turned south, drove till I came to the next intersecting road that I knew took me into town, and turn west there! (I beat 99.99% of the people on the road from Carhenge back to town.

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      • Sounds like great fun for people able to view it at home. It must be quite an experience for visitors to Nebraska to find their way to Alliance and back home again. We had a total eclipse over my city of residence back in January 1990 in summer and it really was weird to have bright sunshine suddenly go dark in the middle of the day.

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      • The trip to Denver from Alliance takes 4 and a half hours. The friends of my friend who didn’t make it over to my home to share the eclipse and all the food I prepared, reported it took seven hours to get back to Denver.

        In other news, here’s a link to a report from a village in the Sandhills of Nebraska and how an eclipse event went sour, with several injuries

        https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wizardsdoor.com%2Fkryptski%2FDOZENS%2520INJURED%2520IN%2520RAVENNA.htm&h=ATP05lQpyHS9gwRF_slGN2k43_F1r09vznRdcEvp0MM6eFBsAvB9qQcpssWOO39S-Q1Q6uBriOjGcv4abTc5dsGee97ueuWtY-k4Pknx94FmoEvwCiULrJ9EX597rBj8BGJ9dezedN2N674DTSMLVlORypn6gwPIAYlvajJ98DYqpQ1r6jHReSt7xX7rZkIOdbT-ghsOE_ENg19qb0Eitvt3Oi8dhqJhcjPXQvXIW8Fx3-oygIV8U_KlqR6Sfs64ZNE2eyVsYDkFordWGE2qCBCRkMewej7OXDA

        Unfortunately, the remark about a chicken drop at the end of the article reminded me of a hilarious scene from an old USA television show, “WKRP in Cincinnati” in which turkeys were dropped from a helicopter in a radio station promotion to give away free Thanksgiving turkeys:

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      • Can’t get on to facebook as I deactivated the account and don’t want to reactivate it for a while. You must have been crowded out if the journey back home took nearly twice as long as usual. Sad that you prepared so much food for people who did not get to your place.

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      • Facebook is addictive and mostly a waste of time. If a loyal bunch of people who follow this blog there didn’t exist, I’d desert it, too.

        I haven’t seen specific crowd numbers, but i suspect there never will be a known quantity of visitors to this town or state for the event. Wyoming estimates a million people came to the state to view it. In a state with 585,501 people, you can imagine what that was like! My friend Craig’s brother (who lives in Colorado) went to Wyoming to view it.

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      • I had few friends contacting me on Facebook and I reallised that the people I did want to have contact with were contacting me in other ways as well, or even visiting. I have never publiished anywhere else outside WordPress. I stopped Facebook when I clicked on a picture one day, and got a message to say my credit card was being accessed. I don’t know whether this was true. but there had been warnings of other scams on Facebook at the time, so I deactivated the account. I am getting along fine without it.

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      • There’s a lot of that sort of stuff on Facebook. During the last election, there was lots of planted fake news (not the Trump “fake news”, but certifiably false articles that supported mostly one candidate). Many conspiracy theories get posted there, and the level of vulgarity is disturbing considering lots of young people are on the site. I regularly block such things, but more pop up.

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      • That’s a fair guess. The fact that many people believe pretty much anything they read on the Internet, Facebook, makes for a seriously ill-informed electorate and messes like we have in America just now. Critical thinking is out the window, and we were stuck with two seriously flawed choices for president, though one, at least, had extensive experience in public service.

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      • Our options do at least have experience in government or public service. I keep reminding myself that we could do much worse than our present options, though lately politics has been quite startling here with leaders and key politicians all pulling out at a surprising rate. Currently our polls show rates to close to call for a likely outcome to the election.

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      • That’s a major plus in my mind. I used to think that, too, then we got Worse 1, Worse 2, and Not Likely to Win 1. The irony is how many candidates started out on the Republican side, a couple of whom I could have lived with. (vote for? hard to say)

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    • Well, it does have photos of lots of things kitties enjoy – birds, fish, outdoor places with lots of places to climb and do wildcat stuff…! (You can’t see the full title, but it is Nebraskaland magazine, a publication of the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.)

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    • He is the intellectual of the two kitty boys, a quiet, directed kitty cat. You may be right!

      I just followed your blog, and I hope Pooh is better and continues to eat. I went through this with Louie the ginger cat, and it is heartbreaking.

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      • Putting toys away and pulling them out after a few months, is just like a new toy. I do this with their tunnel. I tuck it away in May and bring it out at the beginning of September. Shoko is delighted to see it. Kali could care less. She spends most of her time sleeping or watching Shoko.

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      • That is the same here. Kali has never really cared for toys and hardly played much even when she was a kitten. She’ll rub up against the Yeow nanner occasionally but that’s the extent of it. I have tried to get her involved in interactive games but if I touch her with the feather or whatever it is….she starts cleaning herself as if the feather left a great mud mark. She isn’t much fun to play with.

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