Post 578: big fat fluffy snow day

I sat at my computer, oblivious to what was happening outside. I scanned down through my Facebook feed and came across snow photos of places within miles of me.

“Oh no!” I thought, “It’s snowing outside and here I sit oblivious to what’s happening outside!” Of course, you already knew that.

But did you know it was snowing my favorite big fat fluffy snow? Oh yeah? You read the headline? Hmm. I guess I’m the only one surprised at me today. Here’s a short film about the big fat fluffy snowstorm of November 2, 2014, in Western Nebraska:

What a wonderful day! If I thought I could get up again, I’d make snow angels!

My cats weren’t interested, much, however. Dougy kind of looked out, but he’s three and a half years old, a big boy now. He just kept on moving. Andy was in the background, but never really came to the door like he often will if Dougy steps outside to experience the snow. All the more big fat fluffy snow for me!

 

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75 thoughts on “Post 578: big fat fluffy snow day

  1. Oh no, snow! I still go out in it Doug and Andy. Once you start walking around in it….you get used to it. The key here is to keep walking and investigating….then you don’t get too cold. Meanwhile mom is heading into the bedroom to put on her long underwear…she says the look of snow makes her feel cold. What a wimp!

    (((Shoko)))

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    • Dougy will go out in it, but I supervise him closely. He tends to follow his nose, which can take him a long way from home if he isn’t careful! Andy is more shy about the outdoors. He prefers it through a window or screen door.

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  2. I love looking at the snow through the window. That wind up my tail, however, makes me understand why your cats prefer indoors. Not really ready for the snow just yet – looks like Old Man Winter found you early!

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    • My end of Nebraska is roughly 1200 meters above sea level, so we tend to have cooler weather sooner than lower elevations. Snow in Novemeber is typical, but, as mentioned in a response to sunsetdragon, we did have a similar snowstorm in September this year. Actually, one July 4th, I remember watching snow fall, but it melted before it hit the ground.

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    • The US voter turnout was deplorable. Thank goodness Australia has compulsory voting, as well as an independent electoral commission. I feel for the US over the coming years. That said, most of us are appalled by our own Prime Minister’s behaviour but at least the election wasn’t rigged and everyone voted (if stupidly). Geez!

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      • An independent election commission would be good. The US equivalent is split between Republicans and Democrats, and decisions are in deadlock on many things, according to one of the members of the board who recently appeared on television to discuss the process of that board. What else is new?

        I don’t know what is worse: compulsory voting, where many stupid votes are cast but the end result is more representative of the whole population’s wishes or the US style elction where a majority of one-third of the potential electorate determines the direction of the country, then all the axxholes who didn’t vote whine about less than desireable outcomes. I think your system is better in that you can’t count on people to do their civic duty, even though their best interests are at risk.

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      • And there’s the difference, Peggy. Here we put the asses in office! (Snark attack…sorry! I’m still working through my disappointment, and I recognize the confusion “ass” vs. “donkey” might cause considering the donkey traditionally represents the Democrats.)

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      • These things are cyclical. The last two congresses are the least productive in US history, the current one less productive than the one just before, which had been ranked as the worst in history. Such mediocrity was rewarded by putting the responsible ones, the obstructionists, in charge of the government. The actions of certain members of the Congress fall pretty close to these definitions, in my mind:

        se·di·tion noun \si-ˈdi-shən\
        ~ the crime of saying, writing, or doing something that encourages people to disobey their government
        Full Definition of SEDITION
        ~ incitement of resistance to or insurrection against lawful authority

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      • It’s nice to know that at least one other Nebraskan shares my views. I bet there are a few others. But here’s an interesting twist. A dear friend and former Nebraskan now lives in Colorado. He lives in such a conservative community that he can’t declare any of his slightly left leaning views for fear that his car will be scratched. Geez!

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      • electionresults.sos.ne.gov/

        If you look at the various races in the link above, you’ll see there is a consistent pattern favoring Republican candidates, except the 2nd Congressional District, where their Congressman (Lee Terry) made the mistake of speaking openly about having a nice home and kids in college as the reason he accepted his salary during the Republican-forced government shutdown of 2012. Didn’t go over well, and he lost, the only national seat from Nebraska now held by a Democrat.

        I don’t feel comfortable openly identifying myself as center to center left in Western Nebraska, either, but, unlike the gutless disloyalty of the Democrats running for Congress, I voted twice for him – 2008 and 2010 – because, flawed candidate or not (history will tell us), the 20098 Republican warhawk senator and a ditsy former beauty queen for vice president in 2008 and the Republican Party’s choice of a plutocrat and a Ayn Rand acolyte in 2010 pretty much told me I no longer fit the ideological niche of today’s Republican, even though I am an old white man, supposedly part of their biggest demographic component.

        Having exposed myself this way, I’ll doubtlessly lose a few readers of this blog, but the main thrust of the blog is retirement and my cats, not my occasional response to the disappointments of the national and state government leaders. (Note I don’t give the Democrats hosannahs either for their inept efforts to hold onto control of the Senate or lose the House.)

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      • Adrian Smith, the 3rd District Congressman, was re-elected with a 75.4% of total votes cast. He’s not that good a Representative! That is to say, if I ran, I’d have to count on the Republican candidate dropping dead the week before the election to have a chance of winning, though he’d probably still be re-elected. No one would notice the difference.

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      • Oh boy, I just did some checking. Lee Terry is son of Lee Terry Sr, a KETV anchorman in the 60s and 70s. I used to babysit the Terry kids after the parents divorced (the dad retained sole custody). Clearly I didn’t indoctrinate him when I had the chance.

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      • I remember him being the KETV anchorman –from reading the Omaha World-Herald– I lived and live all the way west, of course. Other than his ridiculous comment about why he continued to accept him Congressional pay when his party shut down the US Government in 2012, I have no specific sense of himn. Typical right wing Nebraska politician, dully predictable and most likely on his fifth, sixth, seventh term in Congress because, well, it’s easier to re-elect the bastards than to examine them closely and make a voting decision based on their aptitude, character, and positions. Was he a brat then, too? (Just being snarky. No answer required!! 😉 )

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      • Me, too, because I recall there was some issue with LT, Senior’s use of alcohol or some such. It’s all a haze after all these years, and I may be remembering slanders, not facts.

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      • Other than his classic Nebraskan ultra-conservative positions politically, I’m not particularly aware of any issue with the soon to be ex-Congressman, other than his stupid remark about accepting his salary when the US Government shutdown was on and many people went without funds and services of the government. Worse things have been done with smaller consequences.

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    • They are year around birds. As long as they have access to food, water, gravel, and some sort of shelter (for example, that fir tree they are flyiong to in the video), they can survive bitterly cold weather. At first, I thought they were pine siskins, a smaller bird, though watching the video it was obvious what they were, the reason I noted what they were in a caption. My cats are indoor cats, by my plan. Dougy would like to explore outside, and often slips outside if the door is held open (for example, to make a video of snow!), but his brother Andy is less brave.

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    • I don’t recommend coming back in wintertime so you can enjoy a little snow, but you may find yourself somewhere some day when the snow falls. Then you’ll remember why you moved to Australia! Ha!

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      • A friend served two years in Tonga as a Peace Corps volunteer. After his tour, he lived two years in Honolulu, where he drove a cab. Then he moved to Los Angeles, where he drove a cab for two more years.

        He decided, then, that he’d return to Nebraska and work on his Master’s degree at Chadron State College while commuting from Alliance. His parents lived here at the time, and the idea was he’d save money this way. He rode to Chadron each day with another person working on her Master’s.

        In the course of a year, there was some snow. If you remember the road through the Chadron STate Park area, especially back in the 1970s before they improved them with passing lanes and the like, you can imagine there was a bit of skillful driving to stay on the road! During these trips on icy roads, the subject of which way one turns the wheels when you start to go in a spin came up. My friend told me about these conversations while I was driving on icy roads, concentrating on staying on the road, so I wasn’t paying attention to what he said.

        He said the lady he rode with said you should turn them one way, and he said the opposite. Frankly, I just do it when I go into a skid, if that happens, and I can’t tell you even now what I do! But, after a trip up to Rapid City with my friend who’d spent six years in tropics or near tropical places, I was to find out!

        The trip up was bad, but the trip back was worse because there’d been melting, then the road froze over in spots. It was a harrowing ride, at slower than highway speeds. My friend, who’d gone to the trouble to renew his Nebraska driver’s license with the idea he could help drive on this trip, suggested he take over after we crossed from South Dakota into Nebraska. By that time, I was amenable to the idea, the switch was made, and, within five miles of the border, we were sliding at 55 mph backwards down the highway into a ditch: He turned the wheels exactly the direction he said he would, and he was wrong!

        Thanks to a Suburban full of Kansas hunters passing by, we got the car out of the ditch and pointed in the right direction. It was a VW Beetle, and they were indestructible!

        My friend lived all his life in Nebraska up till he volunteered for the Peace Corps, so had winter driving experience, but the six years in warmer climes was sufficient to turn him into a danger on icy roads.

        Speaking of icy roads, I tried for a long time to figure out where exactly we had out mishap because my sense of it was we lost control on a hill, something you’d expect in northwest Nebraska. I finally worked out the location, and it was the flattest section of road for miles, no hill at all!

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