Post 1987: ‘nip!



…the ‘nip

It’s been a time or two since I shared the ‘nip with the local ‘nip aficionado, Andy. He was amused.

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43 thoughts on “Post 1987: ‘nip!

  1. My Tortie neighbor Pip would be all over that nip! She luvs the fresh stuffs! I like it when it’s crumbly and dry. Mom sprinkles it over my furrs. Does Andy like the dry stuffs, too?

    • Any way they can get it, yes! I think Andy prefers the fresh, but Dougy is less enthusiastic for ‘nip. Neither becomes silly and kittenish when under its spell, though, because they are pedigree kitties. You know what I mean! Ha!

    • Yes, I crush the leaves in my fingers to enhance the stench of this kitty treat. Andy drools over them, anticipating the glory of fresh herb slipping down his throat I guess, then he snarfs the leaves down before Dougy can share them. (Dougy defers to his brother on edibles, though he doesn’t act like a second-in- command kitty in other matters….)

    • It has a place of honor next to a kalincoe plant that puts out lovely little clusters of salmon flowers this time of year. I planted several seeds in an empty kitty treat containers that is ugly as cuss but is a workable cachepot for this useful weed. Of course, I “prune” it from time to time to make sure I have a happy Andy!

    • It’s on a window sill behind the kitchen sink. Amazingly, though the kitty boys watch me “harvest” leaves for them, they don’t both that or a kalincoe growing in another cachepot on that shelf. For that matter, there’s a dining room window sill that the kitty boys love, love, love to watch the scene from that has potted marigolds growing on the other side that they have never bothered. Their specialty is destroying furniture, not growing plants!

    • Yes, a musky mint smell that I find a bit cloying. It is a weed, of course, related to the mint family. Once it establishes itself, you have a runaway on your hand.

    • I’m well, Michel, thank you! Hope you are getting along with the fistula! Andy AND Dougy are spoiled rotten, thanks to my inexperience with kittens when they were young.

      • For the dialysis all in all this goes rather well only. Indeed the fistula is very superficial and the nurses often plant their needles to deep. . So I have two hard hematomas and sometimes I have only one needle , planted . But all in all all is good ///

      • For the dialysis all in all this goes rather well only. Indeed the fistula is very superficial and the nurses often plant their needles to deep. . So I have two hard hematomas and sometimes I have only one needle , planted . But all in all this is doing well?

        • Yes, the medical staff can sometimes cause more pain (and hematomas!) than one wants when inserting the needles! My bottom buttonhole is easy to use and I rarely feel the needle going in. The top one is near a place in the fistula that takes a downward turn. It requires familiarity with where the buttonhole is to avoid causing me lots of discomfort (“pain”!) inserting the needle. Some of the nurses get it in right away. Others end up having to ask more experiences ones to do it for them because they keep missing the angle the needle has to be before it goes in. The matter of pushing the needle in too deep is perhaps less a problem for me because they use dull needles instead of the sharp ones they had to use at first. They don’t penetrate the fistula wall, but, if the nurse jams them in too deeply, then pulls them back out a bit, I will have those hematomas and pain from the process. Fortunately, the staff at the dialysis unit here are experienced enough with my fistula now that things usually go well for me! I hope your dialysis staff become more familiar with yours so you can have a more pleasant experience in future, Michel! Greetings to your lovely wife Janine, too!

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