JFK

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Fifty years are not enough to forget the day.

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14 thoughts on “JFK

    • I couldn’t get through describing my personal experience with that event or the horrific murders of the four girls in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders, Medgar Evers, Dr. Martin Luther King, and Robert F. Kennedy that followed. Bull Connors is dead, and the world is a better place. The years 1963 through 1970 are closed off to me, no positive thoughts that cancel out the sadness of those tragedies.

  1. Later on in the vid he’s wearing a t-shirt with a face but not sure if it’s Jim Hendrix but I don’t think so. I don’t recognise him but as I don’t watch TV that’s not surprising.

    Well I certainly don’t agree with everything he says. Certainly though it is shocking what he starts saying about 6:50 that is at the back of his new book.

    Check this out and bear in mind it was made in 1985;

    • He is wearing a t-shirt with Jimi Hendrix on it, as you thought.

      I’ve seen the second video before. I see how it happens, can happen, but am a fatalist. Look how many people voted for Romney, even though he holds the little people (most people whom I know, myself) in a category of contempt. I think they are brainwashed to vote for someone who cares little for programs that benefit the least powerful (the people I know who all fit into Romney’s 47% class of people…) in my country’s society for the benefit of a few in the upper 10%. (Of course, they see me as the brainwashed one since I didn’t support Romney.)

      Understand that I stressed myself out considerably last year during the election trying to present rational arguments to people who refuse to hear anything but the Fox News version of things, and am at a point this year where I’ll present my point of view, but am uninterested in explaining it to anyone: you either agree with me (for the right reasons, I hope) or don’t (because you trust your blog or news sources more than you trust mine).

      I’ve posted it before, but I especially like Wm. McAdoo’s statement: “It is impossible to defeat an ignorant man in argument.” The rub is sorting out who is ignorant, hoping one’s own knowledge is adequate to comment on a topic when asked. Many things you bring up I fit into the “ignorant” category in my knowledge of them, so rather not comment much, but do.

      My university training was in journalism. I tend to be a bit skeptical and fussy about source credibility. The Internet makes it easy to find sources that back up any point of view anyone has, but difficult to sort out the valid sources from the ones with political agendas. Television news is more entertainment than news these days. While there is more stuff out there on any topic, one still has to sort through it all carefully, diligently, with one’s BS filters up and activated. If it sounds to good to be true, it probably is false. If the language is inflamatory, it probably is somewhere between tweaked to support a point of view and an outright lie. If known reputable sources (New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal), one still needs to read them with awareness of the liberal slant of the Times and the business conservative slant of the WSJ, for example. Reading the press of another country, there still is a need to be aware of bias and the paper’s international reputation for accuracy. I trust Reuters, but might read a report from the Xinhua News Agency with a little more caution.

      Again, I’m not much on conspiracy theories, sensationalism, the Apocalypse, predictions. They all involve opinion, untestable contentions, faith in limited facts, suspicious motives, or someone out to make a buck on the willingness of others to buy into their theories. (For example, wasn’t it the 14th when the entire electrical grid was to shut down at once, leaving the United States on the brink of total ruin, the banking system in collapse and ruin, the dollar destroyed as a unit of value? That’s one source I suggest you set aside.) Of course, the source might be like those revivalist Protestant sects of the 19th Century where gullible people sold everything and sat on the hillside waiting for the end of the world the leader predicted would happen on such-and-such a date. When it didn’t happen, the true believers didn’t despair. They just chose another day and explained away the error as a glitch in the communication line between God and the Ultimate Leader….brainwashing.)

      Ventura has some reasonable ideas that should be considered and some that are pure BS, but that’s just my opinion. Beyond doubt, he is entertaining, and the state of Minnesota didn’t go down the drain during his term, as far as I know. (Of course, that state has a more open-minded electorate than, say, Texas, with more parties than Republican and Democrat involved in the political process. They historically tend to be more Libertarian, Progressive, or more leftish than other states.)

  2. Sorry I didn’t realise the vid is so long, listen for a minute starting at 5:55 and see what he says that is totally shocking.

    {Do you know who is the picture on his T-shirt?)

    • Since it looks like he’s wearing a leather jacket to me, I’m not sure if that’s what you mean or not, Shaun. Anyway, I listened to a lot of the video (half, at least). I guess you refer to the foreign aid business. Like all government expenses, there are dubious appropriations and appropriations that benefit the people for whom they are intended. The Marshall Plan is a notable success story for foreign aid, as is the Berlin Airlift. On the other hand, Mubarek had (it is purported) a heavy hand in the aid we sent that country. Saddam Hussein got aid from the US before the 1990s…! At any rate, it is a smallish expense compared with the military that gets more money than the 26 next largest militaries in the world. Only a select few know how much money goes into the various spy agencies. So-called entitlements are larger than the military budget, but anyone who’s worked for a lesson knows that taxes take money out of paychecks for Social Security and Medicare as long as a person’s working. It’s put in a trust fund, isn’t appropriated funds, and in fact, is one source of borrowed cash from the US Government: we owe us…! ANd get some interest back when it’s repaid. I think Jessie’s understanding is a bit simplistic when it comes to the budget, unless I’m full of it.

  3. Ventura has some interesting insights, some of which I can agree with, some that just doesn’t cut it with me. I agree with his views on not shutting down the government for political purposes, for example, but don’t see foreign aid as a big enough a component of the total budget to worry about- yet. (It is a form of bribe, I agree! On the other hand, where the money goes to disaster relief, I approve, or for infrastructure improvements, though this country needs attention in that regard, too!) His comments on Veteran Affairs I agree with. Anyway, for every conspiracy theory book showing X numbers of ways Kennedy was shot by more than one assassin, or this group or government put a hit on him, or whatever, there’s another that gives X reasons the official version is the only truth. I stopped paying attention to any and all such books, films, blogs, whatever. It comes down to something like belief in God: whatever you have faith in is the truth, provable or not. I totally agree with him on news and how there needs to be more accountable, removed from ideology.

    • I think you are right. Watching the replays on television yesterday, the emotions I felt were just as raw and strong as the days when the events were just news flashes or coverage of the transition to Johnson and the funeral.

  4. We live in a crazy world and it’s only getting crazier. I can’t imagine what it would have been like to be there the day of the assassination.

    • It was surreal. “This doesn’t happen in America…” was the thought that kept going through my head. I was a 10th grader at the time, very idealistic, very enthusiastic about the possibilities of landing on the moon and all the other things (Peace Corps, civil rights) JFK fostered during his short run. He was an inspirational, positive speaker, unlike the negativity that spews out of Washington these days.

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