Post 1400: tattletail…

While cleaning his right paw, Andy saw Dougy…

…ripping into Doug’s password notebook. (Fortunately, it was the section of pages with obsolete passwords, not any current ones!)

Just the same, for alerting me, I know a that kitty deserves extra kitty treats today!

10 thoughts on “Post 1400: tattletail…

    • You know how it goes, Angela: you forget a password, have to create a new one before you can access you bank statement or an online bill…! The more passwords you have, the less likely you are to remember each one unless you use the same one for everything. Of course, different places require different lengths and styles of passwords, to further confuse and thwart remembering them. After a time where it seemed I had to create a new password each time I accessed accounts because I was always forgetting new passwords for putting in the wrong one by mistake, I finally decided to create a notebook of all passwords. I cross out the ones I change for whatever reason and record the particulars and the date I changed the password so I know which is the most current in case I forget to cross out the old one. I know this practice isn’t encouraged, but any one with larceny in their hearts will find a way to access my accounts anyway, no matter how many layers of security I have on them.

      Andy always enjoys his treats, and thanks you for being concerned! Meow!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Wow I never thought to date them, thanks for the tip. Your experience and rationale pretty much the same as mine.

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      • My worksheet is simple: Name of the account or business requiring a password/ my user name for that account or business/ password/ date I created the password. If I change it, I cross through the whole line and create a new one. I pretty much know from experience which accounts I’m likely to change regularly, so I leave a few blank spaces so I can record new passwords and dates of creation. I try to alphabetize the lists, but that goes to hell soon enough, and I have to recopy the page to eliminate crossed out lines and to re-establish an alphabetized list. This would be very simple on a spreadsheet, of course, but the possibility of being hacked makes that too risky. The possibility of someone breaking in and taking the book exists, too. One just has to decide which way is more safe.

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    • I don’t dare leave printed matter on the floor by a chair if I plan on reading it or giving it away to someone else when I’m through with it. Both kitty boys will scratch at magazines, catalogs, newspapers, even a simple piece of copier paper, like they are trying to “fluff” it up for a nest. The end result is shredded, ripped paper.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Amen! That’s one good reason to change them often, something most businesses make their employees do but that most private citizens fail to do. Fortunately for me, I regularly screw up on them and end up changing them because of it. Another reason I keep the notorious and unsafe notebook….

      Liked by 1 person

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